Monday, 26 March 2012

Calls for papers: a weekly round up

Castastrophic Masculinities: 2012 International Conference on Romanticism Special Session, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 8-11 November 2012

Despite several key theoretical texts (Foucault, Sedgwick, Haggerty, Elfenbein) focusing on masculinity and sexuality during the Romantic period, scholars have been surprisingly slow to incorporate such theoretical approaches to masculinity and sexuality. This panel seeks papers that draw on, rework, and/or expand knowledge of masculinity and sexuality during the Romantic period by focusing on catastrophic masculinity. What counted as catastrophic masculinity during the period? How were such masculinities constructed through medical, juridical, religious, social, cultural, subcultural, and other discourses? While papers on the canonical Big Six male poets are welcome, the organisers hope to also include papers that situate catastrophic masculinity within more recent understandings of the ever-expanding Romantic canon, including the novel, drama, poetry regardless of the author’s sex, race, or class, and Romantic prose in its various forms between roughly 1780-1830.

In an effort to stimulate scholarship on masculinity and the history of sexuality during the Romantic period, this panel welcomes papers focusing on literary representations of masculinities, bodies, and practices commonly labeled catastrophic, disruptive, or violent during the period.

Suggested topics include:

Sensibility and/as catastrophic masculinity
Catastrophic masculinity in the Oriental tale
Colonialism and catastrophic masculinity
Masculinity and excessive desires and drives
Excessive consumption and/as catastrophic masculinity
Masculine women, effeminate men and/as catastrophic masculinities
Representations of monstrous, unnatural, or unspeakable masculinities as catastrophic
Seduction, abandonment, marriage, and/or reproduction as catastrophic
Disciplinary mechanisms regulating catastrophic masculinity and sites of resistance
Historical, medical, scientific, legal, and religious discourses that deemed specific kinds of masculinity catastrophic

Email one-page abstracts to Dr Nowell Marshall by 1 April 2012.

Richard Marsh: re-reading the fin de siècle
A one-day symposium at the University of Brighton, 20th July 2012

Richard Marsh is best-known for his 1897 novel The Beetle, a gothic bestseller at the time more popular than Dracula. Indeed Marsh was a prolific and extremely successful writer in the 1890s and the early 20th century. Strikingly, however, his writing has until recently been mostly forgotten. With several of his novels and shorter fictions now being republished, this situation is set to change. The symposium seeks to harness renewed academic interest in Marsh towards a reappraisal of his significance for a fin de siècle culture that is often considered to offer a kind of mirror onto our own culture at the start of the 21st century. It will bring together literary and historical specialists of the period to examine Marsh's oeuvre as a whole. A central concern will be to examine how Marsh's ambivalent fiction often works against the grain of more canonical texts and therefore has the potential productively to unsettle what it is thought is known about fin de siècle culture. Understanding late-Victorian / Edwardian questions about gender and sexuality, imperialism, science and the nature of history, surely remain incomplete without negotiating the complex terrain of Richard Marsh's writing.

We invite abstracts for papers on any aspect of Marsh's output, but in particular on the following themes:

Gothic
Fictions of crime and detection
Romance
Comedy
Discourses of race, empire and eugenics
The New Woman
Homosociality and homosexuality
Late-Victorian understandings of history / the use of the classical past
The literary market-place
Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words for 20 minute papers to d.orrells@warwick.ac.uk and v.margree@brighton.ac.uk by 20 April 2012.

Call for articles: OScholars Conan Doyle Special

Articles of between 1500 and 2500 words are sought for a special issue of the OScholars to be edited by Karen Devlin. Submissions will be accepted by Karen Devlin on the basis of an abstract of around 250 words and will then be double-blind peer reviewed. Subjects may include but are not limited to:

Conan Doyle and Scotland
Conan Doyle and Ireland
Conan Doyle and his contemporaries
The literary legacy of Conan Doyle
The influence of Maupassant on Conan Doyle
The 'Sherlockian' or 'Holmesian' phenomenon
London as metonym in the work of Conan Doyle
Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot
Conan Doyle as mediaevalist
Conan Doyle and masculinity
Conan Doyle's depiction of women
Conan Doyle and imperialism
Pastiche parodies and plagiarism

Contributors are encouraged to look beyond the Holmes canon. Abstracts should be sent to Karen Devlin by 30 May 2012

'Romantic Legacies': a one-day seminar at Nottingham Trent University, 26 October 2012

The Midlands Romantic Seminar (MRS) is issuing a call for papers for a one day seminar to take place at Nottingham Trent University on Friday the 26th of October 2012 on the subject of ‘Romantic Legacies’. A broad understanding of Romanticism and literary, cultural, political and historical legacies is intended, and an interdisciplinary audience and contributions are welcomed.

A plenary paper from guest speaker Damian Walford Davies (Aberystwyth University) will be followed by papers received in response to this call, and a round table discussion of the material presented to close. Depending on the level of response, the seminar might run over the course of an afternoon, or the whole day. 
Abstracts of 250 words for papers lasting around 20 minutes should be forwarded to Carol Bolton  or Tom Knowles  by 31 July 2012. Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you require further information.





5 comments:

  1. The audio also has its share of problems. The English replica handbags track has is the worse affected, especially on the 4th episode. When played in Pro-Logic mode gucci replica, the voices are coming out of the back speakers, similar to the rolex replica Slayers boxset audio problem. The Japanese track is breitling replica suffering from a hollowness in Pro-Logic.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Check out is usually a prerequisite for you no matter what their own era, in addition to sexuality. Custom made rolex replica, intended for a number of us there're an essential acquire definitely not a lot underneath the latest car or truck or maybe your primary household. There're definitely a superior conclude extravagance piece particularly when they've already a lot of the fake rolex companies that any of us be expecting a whole lot by placed on these individuals. Just a several replica Breitling watches, this processes in addition to expectations connected with located include modified widely. Behind closed doors, to help keep an individual's societal location, it is advisable to invest in and possess extravagance merchandise which might be insanely high priced. With new fake rolex datejust, one needs to help flaunt an individual's rank symbolic representation when in front of some others. While using the surge connected with purchaser way of life, persons feel the astounding ought to invest in an increasing number of. In this particular battle for being very best, one needs to obtain the most beneficial connected with merchandise. It's not necessarily simple for frequent, heart category fake rolex watches to obtain in addition to have the funds for like conveniences because of their normal profits.

    ReplyDelete
  3. 2005 Superocean Replica Watches from the same decade for $2,000 – $3,000? That said, it’ll take someone with very Replica watches UK particular tastes to go for the Rolex Oyster Dominos Pizza special. In any case, you’ll find our favourite handbag replica affordable replica watches from the sale below; alternatively, you can view all 313 Replica handbags from the lotlist for Antiquorum’s New York auction in the Classic Driver Market.Oyster Rolex Daytona bracelet is the perfect shape.

    ReplyDelete